Termite Interceptors

Termite Detection

Accuracy, Speed, & Miscible Tasks

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

Summary: Termite detection, to be practical, must limit the rate of false alarms.  Detection accuracy, however, must be matched by fast, efficient inspections, or the costs of termite detection are not economical.  The EntomoBiotic Termite Interceptor, Annunciator, & Inoculator (TIAI) accomplishes accurate, fast inspections by emphasizing miscible tasking within the pest management model.  In the process, adding termite detection to an ordinary pest control service, while multiplying value, doesn't increase technician service time.  By properly collating service activities, technicians are able to service active termite interceptors in parallel with other pest management services. providing superior termite control without reducing the number of daily service calls they can perform. Scroll down to read full text of article.  Next...   Home...

-------------------------------------------------------------------------

What termite specialists need is a practical termite detector.  Such a detector has to work hard, so that the termite specialist won't have to, and will keep false alarms so low that they are never an issue.

A detector that is 100% accurate isn't any good if it's too hard to inspect. The EntomoBiotic Termite Interceptor & Inoculator (TIAI) put inspection speed and accuracy on the same level.  Inspections were so fast they didn't increase the inspector's time, energy, or aggravation.  All because they allow what we called miscible tasking.

Miscible things, whether objects, solutions, or jobs, can be mixed. When related jobs are mixed together, the combined work often takes less time.  Mixing ordinary pest control work with the The EntomoBiotic Termite Interceptor & Inoculator (TIAI) lets specialists perform interceptor inspections without slowing things down. 

Here's what that means, by way of analogy: Take a box that holds a certain number of basketballs exactly, so that no more basketballs can be added without increasing the size of the box. Now add a ping pong ball--it drops through a gap between the basketballs and falls to the bottom of the box.  The basketballs--representing the exterminator's traditional task set--still fit exactly, yet a large number of  ping pong balls--representing the added EntomoBiotic Termite Interceptor & Inoculator (TIAI) inspections-- fit into the same box.

Adding inspections of EntomoBiotic Termite Interceptor & Inoculators (TIAI)  to an ordinary pest management service call had no effect on the time required to do the job, but improved the job's value to the customer. Pest managers could charge more, because their service accomplished more, but their service technicians didn't get bogged down with time-consuming, aggravating, grunt-type inspections.

What about servicing the EntomoBiotic Termite Interceptor, Annunciator, & Inoculator (TIAI), once it intercepts termites?  Did that change the number of service calls the technician can make in a day? No more than any other pest management issue, that the technician inspects for and has to deal with at a customer's site. 

We designed this device to allow fast, easy servicing, without having to open the device, so all the service technician had to do was inject the inoculant and move on.  Of course, injecting inoculant takes at least a small portion of added time, but we cut the portion needed to a minimum, so it can be factored into the technician's schedule, along with the other additions that come along in the normal service program.  With proper scheduling, the technician could be able to complete as many service calls as before. 

Versatility

Termite detection is only the first step in termite control.  The next step is to do something about the termites that have been intercepted. We designed the EntomoBiotic Termite Interceptor & Inoculator (TIAI)  to do much more than detect termites:

        • It facilitated nullifying the termite colonies it intercepted, within a reasonable period of time, and

        • It used materials that are non-toxic to mammals, and that are free of toxic chemical termiticides.

  More...

--------------------------------------------------------------

Links to Websites on Termite Detection:

Inspector Kody, Canada's first termite detecting dog:  http://www.utoronto.ca/forest/termite/ScheduleOCR Output/K9_Termite_Detection.pdf  Also, Critter-Gitter termite sniffing canines: http://www.critter-gitter.com/page4.html in Pensacola, Florida; In Australia: http://www.k9centre.com/dog_training/detection_dog_training/termite_detection_dogs/termite_detection_dogs.html get the scoop on termite detection dogs.  

Termite Detection System Inc.  http://www.termitedetector.com/home.php  Termites are detected by the carbon dioxide gas they produce in their nests.

Termatrac termite detection system: http://www.termiteexperts.com.au/termite-products/termatrac-termite-detection-system.html The Termatrac system emits signals that pass through wood and are reflected back to the transmitter.  If the signals are interrupted by termite activity, the detector alerts the user that termites are present.

Nan-yao Su, University of Florida: http://news.ufl.edu/2002/08/20/termitechip/ announces a new electronic termite detection device that is buried in the soil.  It consists of a circuit board that, on being chewed on by termites, announces their presence to an inspector who inspects by recording readings from the devices.  This system eliminates the need for visual inspections of termite detectors.

Pestfinder: http://www.pestfinder.com/ A termite detector that scans walls in homes.

Halo Detection: http://www.dowagro.com/halo/what.htm From Dow AgroSciences, uses a handheld interrogator that, when placed in contact with a termite detector in the soil will signal, via a LED display, if termites are in the device or not.

Greg Henderson et al.  University of Louisiana: http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/1998/11/981125045524.htm Dr. Henderson discovered that certain termites produce naphthalene in their nests; he then went to work on a naphthalene detection device that promises to detect the presence of termites.

Please send suggested additions to the above list, or corrections to any of the captions provided, to jerry.cates@entomobiotics.com.

--------------------------------------------------------------

* TERMITE ENCOUNTERS SNAKE ENCOUNTERS SNAKE BITE FIRST AID * SNAKE EXCLUSION * SPIDER ENCOUNTERS * SPIDER BITE FIRST AID * SPIDER EXTERMINATION * PUSS CATERPILLAR ENCOUNTERS * PUSS CATERPILLAR FIRST AID * PUSS CATERPILLAR EXTERMINATIONAssembled & Edited by Jerry Cates. Questions? Corrections? Comments? BUG ME RIGHT NOW! ---- Ph: 512-331-1111 ---- E-Mail ---- Privacy ---- BugsInTheNews